Home | Sitemap | FAQ | Flash-Movies | About Us | Web Links | Contact
You are here: Home
Free knowledge base about matriarchal indigenous societies.
 
The Term Matriarchy
Description of Matriarchy
Ecourse Matriarchy

"Today's Matriarchies From the Newest View"

Free E-Course about unknown facts of indigenous cultures around the word.

Use the form on the right sidebar to subscribe. ->

Read more...
 
Peaceful Societies

You can call them "Segmentary Societies" like Emile Durkheim, "Regulated Anarchies" like Max Weber, "Peaceful Societies" like on the Website mentioned below or "Matriarchy", like German Scholars define it (not to confuse with Bachofen, goddess movement or FemDom). It all is the same kind of society with the same patterns.

Read more...
 
Meeting The Other (How to Learn about Humanity)

I just found an article by author David Maybury-Lewis, where he described the confrontation with people who are different, "others". Meeting the other is combined with lots of prejudices in patriarchal societies. Patriarchal people are not open for something new. (See differences between matriarchal and patriarchal views.)

Here is a part of Maybury-Lewis' adventure: I wanted to study a central Brazilian tribe that had a dual organization that was not breaking down. The only sure way to do that was to study one that had very little contact with the outside world. But such a people might not welcome outsiders

Read more...
 
Decision making by consensus

Kwasi Wiredu, a professor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida, Tampa, and currently has a visiting professorship at Duke University, explains and discusses the use of the consensus principle for political theory and practice in Africa.

As determined by definition consensus is one of the major and typical characteristics of a matriarchal society.

Read more...
 
Ghost

The word ghost is a cognate of "guest," both words rooted in Germanic Geist, originally a spirit of a dead ancestor invited to tribal feasts on such occasions as Samhain (Halloween) and other solemn ceremonies.

Read more...
 
Matriarchy As a Sociocultural Form - An Old Debate in a New Light

[Summarized*]

click to enlarge
Rumah Adat Minangkabau Gathering House
In the following I argue for a reconfiguration of the term matriarchy not as a construct based on the gendered division of political power, but one based on gendered divisions in the sociocultural and cosmological orders.

Aware of the disdain that the term matriarchy evokes in the minds of many anthropologists, I suggest that matriarchy has never been theorized in and of itself.

Read more...
 
Saharasia: The 4000 BCE Origins of Child Abuse, Sex-Repression, Warfare and Social Violence

saharasia.jpgExcerpt: New Study of retired professor James DeMeo, Ph.D., on the Origins of Violence Proves: Ancient Humans Were Peaceful, Modern Violence is Avoidable.

His study is unusual in that it presents the first world maps of human behavior, as developed from large anthropological, historical and archaeological data bases. "A massive climate change shook the ancient world, when approximately 6000 years ago vast areas of lush grassland and forest in the Old World began to quickly dry out and convert into harsh desert.

DeMeo's maps show spreading centers for the origins of patriarchal authoritarian cultures within this same Saharasian global region - male-dominated, child-abusive, sex-repressive cultures with a great emphasis upon war-making and empire-building. DeMeo points to the work of the controversial natural scientist Wilhelm Reich to explain the patterns.

Read more...
 
The Term Matriarchy

In Balance
Society in Balance
The term Matriarchy is a reproduction from that 19. Century and corresponds etymologically to designations such as monarchy, hierarchy, patriarchy, etc. (From Greek mÍtÍr "mother" and archÍ "beginning, origin", later also "rule").

Read more...
 

Search

ECOURSE

"Today's Matriarchies From the Newest View"

7 parts
one Email per week
Your hostess on this website: Hannelore Vonier

Editor Hannelore Vonier welcomes you!


Tell us where you live:
GuestMap

| Home | FAQ - Asked Questions | Contact Us |